CERVIX | CERVICAL SCREENING [ISSN 1804-087X]
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PARTNERS AND EXPERT GUARANTEE
 
Czech Gynaecological and Obstetrical Society | Ministry of Health | Institute of Biostatistics and Analyses, Masaryk University
GRANT SUPPORT OF THE PROJECT
 
GlaxoSmithKline     Roche |

Other sources of information
Cervical cytology (in Czech)www.cipek.cz
Cervical cytology
 
Cancer Screening in the European Unionec.europa.eu
Cancer Screening in the European Union (2017)
[ 10,6 MB]
 
SVOD - Epidemiology of malignant tumours in the Czech Republicwww.svod.cz
Epidemiology of malignant tumours
in the Czech Republic
 
NCI Bethesda System
HPV College

 

Epidemiology of cervical cancer in the Czech Republic

IN-DEPTH INFORMATION

Do you need a more detailed epidemiological analysis? Visit www.svod.cz where you can set numerous parameters according to your individual needs.

svod.cz: cancer epidemiology in the Czech Republic

J. Mužík, L. Šnajdrová, J. Gregor

Institute of Biostatistics and Analyses, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic

CONTENTS

 

Introduction

The Czech National Cancer Registry (CNCR) is the main source of data on cancer epidemiology in the Czech Republic. CNCR has become an integral part of comprehensive cancer care, containing more than 2.2 million records from the period 1977–2014 and covering 100% of the Czech population. Registration of malignant tumours is stipulated by law and is obligatory [1]. CNCR data is publicly available on the website www.svod.cz [2].

 

Incidence and mortality rates

Cervical cancer is a relatively common type of cancer in women worldwide, affecting young women in many cases. Each year, around 1,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer in the Czech Republic, and there are nearly 400 deaths from cervical cancer among Czech women. Both incidence and mortality trends have mostly stagnated in the entire monitored period; a slight decrease has been observed only recently (Fig. 1a). In 2014, there were 823 new cases of cervical cancer, corresponding to more than 15 cancers per 100,000 women in the Czech population. In the same year, there were 365 cervical cancer deaths among women in the Czech Republic, corresponding to almost 7 cervical cancer deaths per 100,000 women in the Czech population.

Apart from absolute numbers of newly diagnosed cases and deaths per year (Fig. 1a), cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates can be recalculated per 100,000 women in the population (Fig. 1b) or standardized on a certain age standard; the most common ones include the age-standardized world rate (ASR-W, Fig. 1c) and the age-standardized European rate (ASR-E, Fig. 1d). Such recalculations make it possible to compare cervical incidence and mortality rates with those of other countries (see more details in Epidemiology of cervical cancer: International comparison).

Cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates

Fig. 1a: Absolute numbers of new cases / deaths. Data source: CNCR Fig. 1b: Rates per 100,000 women. Data source: CNCR
Fig. 1c: Age-standardized world rates (ASR-W). Data source: CNCR Fig. 1d: Age-standardized European rates (ASR-E). Data source: CNCR

 

Prevalence rates

A slight decrease in mortality rates has been observed only recently (see above). More or less stable incidence rates, however, have inevitably led to an increase in prevalence rates, i.e. the number of cervical cancer survivors. In 2014, the prevalence of patients with a history of cervical cancer reached 17,590, corresponding to a 18% increase in comparison with 2004 (14,930 cervical cancer survivors) (Fig. 2a).

Prevalence can be also expressed as a rate per 100,000 women in the population (Fig. 2b), allowing the comparison with other countries (see Fig. 4 in Epidemiology of cervical cancer: international comparison).

Cervical cancer prevalence rates

Fig. 2a: Absolute numbers of cervical cancer survivors. Data source: CNCR Fig. 2b: Cervical cancer prevalence rates per 100,000 women. Data source: CNCR

 

Clinical stages

It is widely known that a cancer diagnosed at an early stage (or even at the stage of precancerous changes) is much more likely to be treated successfully and that the chance of survival in such cases is much higher. Available population-based data on cervical cancer epidemiology in the Czech Republic, however, show that the proportion of advanced stages in newly diagnosed cases of cervical cancer is more or less stable (Fig. 3a). In 2014, almost 33% of new cases of cervical cancer were diagnosed at advanced stages III or IV. Fig. 3b shows trends in cervical cancer incidence rates when taking into account the stage at which the disease is diagnosed.

Clinical stages of cervical cancer

Fig. 3a: Proportion of clinical stages. Data source: CNCR Fig. 3b: Incidence rates for C50 according to clinical stages. Data source: CNCR.

 

Age structure of patients

Cervical cancer typically affects women in working age. Almost 35% of all patients are under the age of 45 (Fig. 4a). Fig. 4b shows the profile of age-specific incidence rates for cervical cancer.

Age structure of cervical cancer patients

Fig. 4a: Proportion of cases in a given age category (analyzed period: 2010–2014). Data source: CNCR. Fig. 4b: Age-specific incidence rate (analyzed period: 2010–2014). Data source: CNCR.

 

References

  1. Institute of Health Information and Statistics of the Czech Republic: Czech National Cancer Registry (CNCR) [23 Mar 2017]. Available from WWW: http://www.uzis.cz/registry-nzis/nor
  2. Dušek, L., Mužík, J., Kubásek, M., Koptíková, J., Žaloudík, J., Vyzula, R.: Epidemiology of malignant tumours in the Czech Republic [online]. Masaryk University, Brno (Czech Republic) 2005. Available from WWW: http://www.svod.cz. ISSN 1802-8861.

Last updated on 23 March 2017