CERVIX | CERVICAL SCREENING [ISSN 1804-087X]
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PARTNERS AND EXPERT GUARANTEE
 
Czech Gynaecological and Obstetrical Society | Ministry of Health | Institute of Biostatistics and Analyses, Masaryk University
GRANT SUPPORT OF THE PROJECT
 
GlaxoSmithKline     Roche |

Other sources of information
Cervical cytology (in Czech)www.cipek.cz
Cervical cytology
 
Cancer Screening in the European Unionec.europa.eu
Cancer Screening in the European Union (2017)
[ 10,6 MB]
 
SVOD - Epidemiology of malignant tumours in the Czech Republicwww.svod.cz
Epidemiology of malignant tumours
in the Czech Republic
 
NCI Bethesda System
HPV College

 

One in six worldwide cancers down to 'largely preventable or treatable' infection

Around one in six worldwide cancers - two million new cases every year - are caused by infections, according to a French study.


death rate from malignant neoplasms per 100,000 inhabitants in 2004 (source: wikipedia.org)

Four particular infections - human papillomaviruses (HPV), Helicobater pylori and hepatitis B and C - were behind 1.9 million cancers, most of which were cancers of the cervix, stomach and liver.

The estimates, published in The Lancet Oncology, show that eighty per cent of these cases occur in less developed parts of the world, where measures to prevent and treat infections are not always widely available.

Lead authors Catherine de Martel and Martyn Plummer, from the International Agency for Research on Cancer, said: "Infections with certain viruses, bacteria, and parasites are one of the biggest and preventable causes of cancer worldwide. Application of existing public-health methods for infection prevention, such as vaccination, safer injection practice, or antimicrobial treatments, could have a substantial effect on future burden of cancer worldwide."

Read the whole article at Cancer Research UK

Reference

  1. de Martel, C., Ferlay, J. et al. (2012). Global burden of cancers attributable to infections in 2008: a review and synthetic analysis The Lancet Oncology DOI: 10.1016/S1470-2045(12)70137-7

9.5.2012 Cancer Research UK


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